Thursday, November 20, 2008

SOME TERRIFIC GODARD CLIPS


For a change of pace, how about some Godard from the early 60s? Here's (above) Anna Karina in the famous dance scene from Godard's "Band of Outsiders." They're dancing the "Madison." It's great, isn't it!?



Here's (above)another scene from the same film. What do you think of Anna Karina's close-up? I'm guessing that Godard was influenced by the close-ups in Dreyer's "Joan of Arc."



Here's (above) a nine-minute scene from "Masculine/Feminine," with Jean-Pierre Leaud and Chantal Goya. Don't let the length deter you. This scene must be watched! You need nine minutes to accomplish the real purpose of the scene, which is to make you fall in love with the characters.

I went through a period where I thought Godard was superficial for using beautiful model-types in so many of his films, but maybe I was the superficial one. I realized later that on film beauty can become a symbol representing youth, delicacy, charm, and the will to live and experience the world.



Godard was good at trailers. Here's (above) the one from "Masculine/Feminine." Is that Goya singing the song?



One more Godard clip (above): It's the powerful final scene in "Breathless." Belmondo dies at Jean Seberg's feet and we go for a close-up on her face. What is she saying here? I can't understand it.

BTW: I JUST PUT UP "LOVE NERDS," THE THEORY CORNER DATING/SOCIAL NETWOKING SITE.

http://theorycornerlovenerds.blogspot.com






I totally break the spell of Godard here, but I couldn't resist adding this...here's (above) the "Hairspray" version of The Madison.

34 comments:

The Modesto Kid said...

Do you know the silent clip of Godard and Karina (both uncredited) from Varda's masterpiece "Cléo from 5 to 7"? Just fantastic -- and I think the inspiration for "Pee Wee's Big Adventure". It's on Youtube, let me look it up... Aha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEzDL4ty2eU

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Modesto: Thanks for the link! I didn't know Godard ever did anything like that!

The Modesto Kid said...

You're welcome; and man oh man should you ever watch that film. Based on your aesthetic preferences in this blog, "Cléo from 5 to 7" would be exactly up your alley. It is the most visually engaging movie in the Nouvelle Vague and IMO the best (IANAFilmCritic though).

JKG said...

Pure Gold!

Deniseletter said...

Hi Eddie,I know this is off-topic,but I think this articles are useful for your hilarious soliloque or dialogue purposes:

http://food.yahoo.com/blog/foxyfestivities/10309/5-reasons-why-you-guys-are-still-single
http://food.yahoo.com/blog/foxyfestivities/8003/8-things-to-never-do-on-a-first-date

Mike Tucker said...

Godard, that's something you throw in a list to sound "smarty-farty". I'm amazed that people actually break down and watch it.

Now back to your big reading chair with fez on your head.

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Denise: An interesting list! Those items about eye contact and chewing sounds were right on.

Dating seems to have diminished in recent years, but it'll make a come back, I'm 100% sure of it. There's just no adequate substitute for it.

Deniseletter said...

I wonder how this subject works with your histrionic talent!

Caleb said...

Thanks for posting these, Eddie. I have been interested in French and Italian films from that era, but didn't really know where to start. I like the balance of dating humor, soda pop culture and existentialism.

oppo said...

I always loved Frnch New Wave Films. They're so dreamy.

But from what I've seen here, I don't think that Godard ever matched François Truffaut's The 400Blows.

Ralph Bakshi is a big Godard fan too, isn't he?

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Oppo: 400 Blows is a classic! Godard and Truffaut were friends and collaborators for a while and I think they both did their best work in this period.

Ralph was a fan of the new wave? I didn't know, but it doesn't surprise me!

oppo said...

Yeah I knew they were freinds. Truffaunt even co-wrote Breathless with Godard.

But I don't know about that Bakshi thing. I got that info from asite that I know to have some errors, so it might not be true. But Bakshi's early films seem to have a "new wave" feel to them, so it would suprize me either.

oppo said...

And Hey, look at this! Pictures from Godard upcoming film, Socialisme [Socialism]!

http://cinemasparagus.blogspot.com/

Jenny Lerew said...

I wonder if Eddie would really care about "Cléo"? If so, I'd have increased respect, but I doubt it. We'll see. 10 to 1 he never makes it through the film. LOL

How recent is this appreciation of Godard, Eddie? It's all good, believe me--but I seem to remember a dismissal of this, which you allude to. Why on earth would you thing he was shallow for casting good-looking actors? I think you have a huge bias for ugliness. ; )

DonB said...

>> What is she saying here?

She first said, "What did he say?"

Other man's voice said "he said, 'you are despicable (dégueulasse)'"

She then said "what is 'dispicable'?", or "what does 'dispicable' mean?"

Good site for finding translations of French words:
www.wordreference.com

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Jenny: I didn't know I was held in low cinematic respect! I'll try to redeem myself by seeing this picture.

I like the idea of handsome and beautiful stars in films, but I resisted the use of fashion models because their's is usually a cold, graphic appeal that's not backed up by acting ability. Godard had a knack for finding people like Karin who had both.

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Don: Thanks! I guess I'll have to see the film again to see how those lines fit in context. I haven't seen a Godard film in ages. I'm dying to see some. I wonder if Turner ever shows them

mike f. said...

Torture. BTW, I think Jean Seberg is saying "I'm a pretentious French twat." (Or maybe "twit" - it's a bit garbled.)

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Mike: Haw! Well, Godard isn't for everybody. You either love him or hate him!

Anonymous said...

um, Mike? Jean Seberg is American. Gosh, who can't love jean seberg?

Godard is as far from pretentious as can be. Actually so are most of the New Wave directors. They were anti-Pretention. That sort of seriousness is part of what they were reacting against in French cinema. FWIW they were all huge fans of Hollywood commercial films. varda & Rohmer a bit less so I think, but Godard & Truffaut-! They loved or at least cared about everything Hollywood.

Or perhaps you were just kidding.

mike f. said...

[Or perhaps you were just kidding]

Anonymous, you have reached the first plateau.

DonB said...

Is Elinor Blake still out there somewhere? It would be great if you (or somebody else) could make a French film parody. She'd be great for the Jean Seberg part.

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

DonB: A really good idea, but Elinor doesn't live out here now!

Deniseletter said...

Eddie,I'm seeing the vids now.BTW related cultural knowledge:Why fez is associte with big reading chair?

Whit said...

The FBI didn't love Jean Seberg. There's a WTF episode of Tiny Toon Adventures that was allegedly inspired by "Alphaville", btw.

Jenny Lerew said...

Mike, that anonymous above is me, pal! : )
And I leaped off that plateau years ago, haw! Only to claw my way up again daily, the better tp hurl myself off with a bloodcurdling screech. Fun!

But oh Mike, please don't call the young and tragic miss Seberg a twat. I'll give you that she plays a twit(and she really does) in "Breathless", but that's intentional.

But come on! Isn't she just stunning? Cute? Stylish? Tsk! How can you be so immune to her charms? Oh, well. I guess I know I can't change a Brooklyn Dodger man's mind once made up, esp. yours, but while Godard was a screwball he definitely had his fun side. I think.

Sorry about the 'anonymous'; I was thumbing in a hasty comment on my iphone believe it or not, and I wasn't logged in. Don't hate me, Jackson.

Now, as for Eddie: I was being(or meant to be) very wry when I wrote about achieving 'respect'. Pure silliness. Good grief, who am I to pick at the gold-leaf of the Uncle Eddie shrine and melt it down for base detailing on bargain Louis X1V imitation furniture? Nuh-uh, not me. Just having a laugh.

That said- isn't the nouvelle vague wonderful, kids? I think so. Eddie, I'm always exhorting Katie or Kali to watch Umbrellas of Cherbourg-not new wave really but certainly french-fun-era. Please look at it & see what you think. Though like an observed lab animal, I find when I recommend something-anything-your response is always the same: "I tried to watch it but after 11 minutes I found it didn't grab me/I hated it/can't see what you see in it, sorry". Oh, the pain!
But try it anyhow sometime. : )

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Denise: I'd like to know the answer to that myself. Maybe sherlock Holmes wore a fez in a scene in one of the novels. Or maybe a fez was to protect the hair from picking up the odor of tobacco when smoking. Just guesses.

mike f. said...

Okay Jenny, now I'm officially embarrassed! Of course I agree with you - no offense to Ms. Seberg.

BTW, I picked up your book recently, which I heartily recommend and am happy to plug here :

http://www.amazon.com/Scrambled-Ink-David-Derrick/dp/1593079516/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1227392722&sr=1-1

(There seems to be some confusion about the title, though. "The Jenny Lerew Book" is how it should read. Darn these publishers and their typos!)

Anonymous said...

Something's wrong with your Mark Kausler and Tim Biskup links.

Mike Tucker said...

Eddie: Turner Movie Classics, has been really good about playing a lot of Januis and classic underground film. Usually late at night on the weekends.
They've also been premiering a lot of great old UK films too.
I was kidding you earlier because I did see "Breathless" back in the spring, either on IFC or Sundance.

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Anon: Thanks for letting me know about the damaged links! I'll fix them tomorrow!

Aaron said...

third clip down, I fall in love once the girl says "I don't agree" and smiles.

Jenny Lerew said...

The really quintessential Eddie french new wave film would be "My Night At Maud's".

Have you seen it, Eddie? Although it should really be seen in a theater to be appreciated rightly as all these titles should, which takes patience, money and gasoline. But it's worth it.

Eddie Fitzgerald said...

Jenny: Thanks for the tip! I'll look out for it!